The Case for Dreamers

Dreamers+protesting+for+equal+rights.
Dreamers protesting for equal rights.

Dreamers protesting for equal rights.

Dreamers protesting for equal rights.

Moises Alvarez, Editor

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For a long time now, many immigrants have entered the U.S. seeking a better a life. The problem is that they are undocumented, so they run the risk of getting deported back to their countries. In many cases, those immigrants are young men and women eager to get a higher education. Thanks to President Obama in 2012, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) allowed those young immigrants temporary permission to stay in the U.S. for two years. The DACA program has generously and greatly impacted the immigrant community by allowing the youth to continue to partake in education.

However, after those two years have expired, without the Lawful Permanent Resident status (LPR) or green card, or U.S. citizenship, they are unsafe. That is where the Dreamers Act of 2017 plays a role in citizenship. The act grants DACA users U.S. citizenship, LPR, and cheaper college tuition. A reduction in college payment extremely benefits the young immigrants hoping for a higher education as many are stuck in between the college transition. Remember, the Dreamers program is only an act and it has to be passed by Congress.

Despite the majority of American support of this bill, it is well-known that the law process is a difficult one given that the Congress is more Republican than Democrat. Often, Democrats support immigration and are more open to diversity in the U.S. Sadly, more Republicans fill up Congress seats which decreases the likelihood of the bill becoming a law. That is not even mentioning the bias, close-minded, xenophobic, and completely incompetent president of this country.

It is without a doubt that the Dreamers Act should be passed as a law. No man or woman should be prohibited from receiving a greater education, especially the scholars working as hard as or even harder than some ungrateful, privileged U.S. citizens. There are even immigrants who arrived in this country as infants and toddlers currently struggling to keep their American dream alive. Raised in the U.S., all they have ever known is this great country that values justice and equality. Those immigrants have gone to school and participated in the pledge of allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, yet they are still denied their rights to citizenship.

The act was an executive order initiated by then President Obama. Recently, however, President Trump with the advice of Attorney General Jeff sessions, discarded the DACA program.

Hopefully, the Dreamers Act becomes a law and these immigrants to the United States get the privilege of being U.S. citizens or residents.

For a long time now, many immigrants have entered the U.S. seeking a better a life. The problem is that they are undocumented, so they run the risk of getting deported back to their countries. In many cases, those immigrants are young men and women eager to get a higher education. Thanks to President Obama in 2012, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) allowed those young immigrants temporary permission to stay in the U.S. for two years. The DACA program has generously and greatly impacted the immigrant community by allowing the youth to continue to partake in education.

However, after those two years have expired, without the Lawful Permanent Resident status (LPR) or green card, or U.S. citizenship, they are unsafe. That is where the Dreamers Act of 2017 plays a role in citizenship. The act grants DACA users U.S. citizenship, LPR, and cheaper college tuition. A reduction in college payment extremely benefits the young immigrants hoping for a higher education as many are stuck in between the college transition. Remember, the Dreamers program is only an act and it has to be passed by Congress.

Despite the majority of American support of this bill, it is well-known that the law process is a difficult one given that the Congress is more Republican than Democrat. Often, Democrats support immigration and are more open to diversity in the U.S. Sadly, more Republicans fill up Congress seats which decreases the likelihood of the bill becoming a law. That is not even mentioning the bias, close-minded, xenophobic, and completely incompetent president of this country.

It is without a doubt that the Dreamers Act should be passed as a law. No man or woman should be prohibited from receiving a greater education, especially the scholars working as hard as or even harder than some ungrateful, privileged U.S. citizens. There are even immigrants who arrived in this country as infants and toddlers currently struggling to keep their American dream alive. Raised in the U.S., all they have ever known is this great country that values justice and equality. Those immigrants have gone to school and participated in the pledge of allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, yet they are still denied their rights to citizenship.

The act was an executive order initiated by then President Obama. Recently, however, President Trump with the advice of Attorney General Jeff sessions, discarded the DACA program.

Hopefully, the Dreamers Act becomes a law and these immigrants to the United States get the privilege of being U.S. citizens or residents.

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